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Microsoft word - seymour_et al.doc

Ella Bay Development, Far North Queensland Expression of Interest in Conducting Research: Research Topic: Community marine safety: Placement of marine stinger enclosures and
educating the community about venomous marine animals

Research Team
Carrette
Matthew

Gordon
Avril

Underwood Tropical Australian

Background and research questions
Then use of the marine environment in tropical Queensland is dependent on the presence or absence of box jellyfish and Irukandji. The presence or absence of these two types of box jellyfish, or cubozoans, determines whether marine water user can safely utilize the marine environment without protective measures being needed. During the stinger season, when both types of jellyfish are present, marine bathers are forced to either use marine stinger enclosures or wear protective clothing, to limit the possibilities of fatal envenomings occurring. Although the use of stinger enclosures have successfully decreased the deaths by large box jellyfish, there specific placement on a beach front should not be guess work, as the density of box jellyfish often vary widely along the beach, and nets should be placed in areas where low densities occur. For example, at Four mile beach at Port Douglas, many thousands of large box jellyfish (eg Chironex fleckeri) can be caught at the southern end of the beach while at the northern end; it is unusual to collect more than a 100 in any one season. Similarly, the density of Irukandji (Carukia barnesi) is routinely higher at the northern end of Palm cove than it is at the southern end. As such, placement of nets for optimal performance and safety should be determined by not only beach shape but also the density of the box jellyfish present. In conjunction wit stinger enclosures, recent work has suggested that education of the public drastically reduces envenomings from not only box jellyfish, but venomous animals as a whole. Determine the species and distribution of cubozoans present on the beach front to determine the most appropriate type and position of stinger enclosure required to give maximum community safety and use. Determine times of high and low risk for marine users in the area Provide information to educate community as to dangers in the marine environment, especially marine stingers, and how best to manage the risk Methodology
Determining densities of box jellyfish (both big box jellyfish and Irukandji).
Studies conducted by TASUR (Tropical Australian Stinger Research Unit) in the
past has shown that regular sampling during the stinger season (usually November to
May) has produced data that allows densities of animals along the beach front to be
determined. For large box jellyfish this is achieved by dragging 25 m ‘bait” nets
along the beach front and also using a sampling vessel to spot larger individuals.
Once spotted, larger individuals can then be tracked using small radio tags and areas
of the beaches preferred by these animals can be determined. For Irukandji, these
animals are sampled by placing large underwater lights in the water. Any Irukandji
present are attracted to the lights and can be captured and again densities of the
animals and preferred areas can be determined By conducting regular sampling
sessions, a real time model to predict the end of the season can be produced,
something that TASRU has already done for the Cairns beaches. A full seasons
collection (i.e. sampling from late October through until early June) is required to
determine the most effective location for the stinger enclosure while a minimum of 3
years data is required to produce a real time model to predict the end of the season as
well as high and low risk days.
Development of “marine education” facility. TASRU already has significant
literature, DVDS and posters that could be utilized to fill a facility with information
that the general public could access. TASRU also has the expertise to develop and
display specimens of venomous marine organisms, with the view to educating both
visitors and residents of the area
Outcomes
There are several outcome of the proposed research, all of which aim to increase the marine safety of the residences and visitors at Ella Bay. These include, but are not limited to, Determination of the best location and type of Stinger enclosure. Production of a real time model to determine the end of the stinger season as well as high and low risk times within the season itself. Education centre with displays etc allowing for the dissemination of information about venomous marine animals, including safe periods of the year, first aid treatment and places for bathers to swim. Dr Jamie Seymour BSc (1986, JCU), Hons (1987, JCU), PhD (1991, JCU)
Dr Jamie Seymour is a senior lecturer in the School of Tropical Biology at James Cook University. He is widely recognized as the leading researcher in the world on the ecology of cubozoans. He is a member of the research board of the Edward Koch Foundation based in Cairns as well as a member of both the research and tourism arm of the Irukandji task force, set up by the Queensland government. He is also the director of the TASRU, the Tropical Stinger Research Unit, a co-operative group involving biological scientists and medical physicians. Since 1995, his major area of research has been on the factors driving seasonal distributions of tropical invertebrates, specifically tropical insects and tropical Cnidarians. Since then, his research has also encompassed identification and determination of cubozoans responsible for causing Irukandji syndrome and the first aid for envenomed victims. More recently, he has developed projects investigating the ecological reasons for differences in the toxicities of venoms produced by different cubozoans. He has pioneered techniques for the attachment of transmitters to cnidarians and is the only person so far to have successfully tracked cubozoans. He has also pioneered new techniques for the extraction of venom from cubozoan nematocysts that allows uncontaminated venom to be collected for experimental purposes. He also has developed a photographic atlas of cnidomes of cubozoans for identification purposes to be used by physicians. He has also developed new techniques that allow the capture of cubozoans with intact tentacles allowing maximum venom return. The culmination of the major part of his research work in the last 3 years has been the production of a real time model that predicts the start and end of the cubozoan season in the Cairns region. Research is being continued in this area to extend the model’s predictive capabilities to encompass the entire east coast of Australia. Dr Seymour has been involved with several international consultative agreements in relation to the ecology of box jellyfish. In 2000 he was invited to investigate possible reasons for the increase in box jellyfish numbers in Hawaii. His research team was able to conclude that numbers where in fact increasing and that it were related to breeding swarms of cubozoans. In 2003 he was invited by the United Nations to determine if a box jellyfish problem was present in East Timor and if so, devise a solution that would minimise the impact on the armed forces in that area. Within a period of 7 days, his research team was able to ascertain that a problem did exist, and was able to produce a workable solution to allow United Nations Armed Forces to swim but yet minimise the chances of being envenomed. Notable, since its inception, no envenomings have occurred. He is also a consultant to the Australian Armed forces in relation to marine envenomings. Dr Seymour’s research has also been highly publicised in films with his work being featured in at least 18 films, many of which have been international, culminating in a 1 hr Discover Channel documentary on box jellyfish presently being filmed which revolves around his research and a 1 hr special on venoms of the world for National Geographic.
Refereed Publications in last 6 years

1) Winter, K.L., G.K. Isbister, J.E. Seymour, W.C. Hodgson,_ An in vivo examination of the
stability of venom from the Australian box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri. Toxicon 49 (2007) 804–809. 2) Underwood, A., Jamie E Seymour. Venom ontogeny, diet and morphology in Carukia barnesi,
a species of Australian box jellyfish that causes Irukandji syndrome. Toxicon 2007 (In press) 3) Garm, A., M. M. Coates, R. Gad, J. Seymour, D.E. Nilsson. The lens eyes of the box jellyfish
Tripedalia cystophora and Chiropsalmus sp. are slow and color-blind. J Comp Physiol A (in press) 4) Winter, K.L., G.K. Isbister, J.E. Seymour, W.C. Hodgson. An in vivo examination of the
stability of venom from the Australian box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri. Toxicon 49 (2007) 804–809 5) M. Little, P. Pereira, T. Carrette, J. Seymour. Jellyfish responsible for Irukandji syndrome. Q J
6) Stone, Richard, Jamie Seymour, Oliver Marshall. Plastic containers and the whole-blood
clotting test: glass remains the best option. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2006) 100, 1168—1172 7) Cameron S, Pereira P, Mulcahy R, Seymour J. Helicopter primary retrieval: tasking who
should do it? Emerg Med Australas. 2005 Aug;17(4):387-91. 8) Loten C, Stokes B, Worsley D, Seymour JE, Jiang S, Isbister GK. A randomized controlled
trial of hot water (45°C) immersion versus ice packs for pain relief in bluebottle stings. Med J Aust 2006; 184:329–333. 9) Coughlan,J.P., J. Seymour & T. F. Cross. Isolation and characterization of seven polymorphic
10) Microsatellite loci in the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri,Cubozoa, Cnidaria) Molecular
11) Seymour, Jamie Box jellyfish and skin damage: The result of venoms or other factors?.
Australasian Journal of Dermatology. 46 Supplement 2:A38-A39, September 2005 12) Canzano, A.A Krockenberger, A.A, Jones R.E., Seymour, J.E. Rates of Metabolism in
Diapausing and Reproductively Active Tropical Butterflies, Euploea core and E. sylvester (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Physiological Entomology (2006) 31, 184–189 13) Carrette, T. & J.E. Seymour. Cardiotoxic effects of venom from Chironex

fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp on an invertebrate model. Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases In Press (accepted Dec 2005) 14) Edwards, W., J. Seymour, K. Pritchard & P. Brock. Egg production across a 40-week period
in the phasmid Sipyloidea sp. (Diapheromeridae) from a tropical rain forest, north Queensland, Australia. Australian Journal of Entomology In Press (accepted Nov 2005) 15) JP Coughlan, J Seymour & TF Cross. Isolation and characterisation of eight polymorphic
microsatellite loci in the cubomedusan box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri, Cubozoa, Cnidaria) J. of Mol. Biol In Press (Accepted Nov 2005) 16) Kintner, A, S. Edwards & J. Seymour. Variation in lethality and effects of two Australian
chirodropid jellyfish venoms, Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp., in fish. Toxicon 46 (6): 699-708 NOV 2005 17) ** Marc Shorten, John Davenport, James E. Seymour, Mary C. Cross, Teresa J. Carrette, Guy
Woodward and Thomas F. Cross. Kinematic analysis of swimming in Australian box jellyfish - Chiropsalmus sp. and Chironex fleckeri (Cubozoa, Cnidaria, Chirodropidae). Journal Of Zoology 267: 371-380 Part 4 DEC 2005 18) ** Gordon, M., C. Hatcher & J. Seymour. Growth and Age Determination Of The Tropical
Australian Cubozoan Chiropsalmus Sp. HYDROBIOLOGIA 530-31: 339-345 2004 19) Sachlikidis N G, Jones C M & Seymour J E. Reproductive cues in Panulirus ornatus.
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Ecology 39 (2): 305-310 2005 20) T. Carrette, J. Seymour. Vascular dopplers: a new way of recording cardiac parameters in
envenomed organisms. Toxicon 45 (4): 541+ MAR 15 2005 21) P.M. Bailey, AJ. Bakker, J.E. Seymour, J. A. Wilce. A functional comparison of the venom
of three Australian jellyfish- Chironex fleckeri, Chiropsalmus sp., and Carybdea xaymacana – on cytosolic Ca haemolysis and Artemia sp. lethality. Toxicon. 2005 Feb;45(2):233-242. 22) Ramasamy S, Isbister GK, Seymour JE, Hodgson WC. Pharmacologically distinct
cardiovascular effects of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) venom and a tentacle-only extract in rats. Toxicology Letters 2005; 155(2):219-226. 23) Ramasamy S, Isbister GK, Seymour JE, Hodgson WC. The in vivo cardiovascular effects of
the Irukandji jellyfish (Carukia barnesi) nematocyst venom and a tentacle extract in rats. Toxicology Letters 2005; 155(1):135-141. 24) Ramasamy S, Isbister GK, Seymour JE, Hodgson WC. The in vivo cardiovascular effects of
an Australasian box jellyfish (Chiropsalmus sp.) venom and a tentacle extract in rats. Toxicon 2005; 45(3): 321-327. 25) ** J. Seymour, T. Carrette, P. Sutherland. Do Box jellyfish sleep at Night? Med J Aust., Dec
26) Isbister GK, Volschenk ES, Seymour JE. Scorpion Stings in Australian: five definite stings
and a review. Intern Med J. 2004 Jul;34(7):427-30. 27) Little M, Pereira PL, Mulcahy R, Carrette T, Seymour J Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate as prehospital treatment for hypertension in Irukandji syndrome.Medical Journal Of Australia 180 (9): 482-483 MAY 3 2004 28) Ramasamy S, Isbister GK, Seymour JE, Hodgson WC. The in vivo cardiovascular effects of
box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri venom in rats: efficacy of pre-treatment with antivenom, verapamil and magnesium sulphate. Toxicon 2004;43(6):685-690. 29) T. Carrette, J. Seymour. A Rapid And Repeatable Method For Venom Extraction From
30) Little, M., & J. Seymour. 2003 Another Cause Of Irukandji Stingings. Med J. Aust Vol
31) ** Nordström, K., R. Wallén, J. Seymour, D. Nilsson. 2003. A Simple Visual System
Without Neurons In Jellyfish Larvae. Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci.;270(1531):2349-54. 32) Little, M., P. Pereira, R. Mulcahy, P. Cullen, T. Carrette & J. Seymour. 2003. Severe Cardiac
Failure Associated With Presumed Jellyfish Sting; Can We Really Call It Severe Irukandji Syndrome? Anesth & Emerg Med. 31 (6): 642-647 DEC 2003 33) Anderson, K., R. Rowe & J.Seymour 2003 The Influence of a Dorsal Trash-package on
Interactions between Mallada signata (Schneider) (Neuroptera:Chrysopidae) larvae. Aust. J. Entom. 42:363-366 34) Canzano, A., R. Jones & J.Seymour 2003 Diapause termination in two species of tropical
butterfly, Euploea core and Euploea sylvester (Lepidoptera:Nymphalidae). J. Aust. Entom.42; 352-356 35) Ramasamy, S, G.K. Isbister, J. E. Seymour & W. C. Hodgson. 2003 The in vitro effects of
two chirodropid (Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp.) venoms: efficacy of box jellyfish antivenom. Toxicon. 41(6):703-711. 36) Huynh,T, J Seymour, P Pereira, R Mulcahy, P Cullen, T Carrette & M Little. 2003 Severity
Of Irukandji Syndrome And Nematocyst Identification From Skin Scrapings. MJA 178:38-41 37) T. Carrette, P. Cullen, R. Mulcahy, M. Little , Pereira. P,& J. Seymour. 2002 Effects Of
Temperature On Box Jellyfish Venom: A Possible Treatment For Envenomed Patients? MJA 177:654-655 38) ** Carrette, T., P. Alderlsade & J. Seymour. 2002 Cnidome composition and prey preference
in two species of cubozoans, Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp. Toxicon 40:1547-1551 39) Seymour, J., T. Carrette, P. Cullen, R. Mulcahy, M. Little & P. Pereira. 2002 The use of
pressure immobilization bandages in the first aid management of cubozoan envenomings. Toxicon.40:1503-1505 40) Seymour J.E. 2002. One touch of venom. American Natural History 9:72-75
41) Taylor, D., P. Pereira, J. Seymour & K.Winkel. 2002 A sting from an unknown jellyfish
species associated with persistent symptoms and raised troponin I levels. Emerg Med (Fremantle). 2002 Jun;14(2):175-80 42) Isbister GK. Little M. Seymour J. Jellyfish stings. Vet Hum Toxicol 2001; 43(6):373
43) Pieloor M. and J.E. Seymour. 2001. Factors determining initiation of over wintering in the
topical butterfly Hypolimnus bolina. Australian Journal of Entomology, 40: 376-379. 44) Pereira PL, Carrette T, Cullen P, Mulcahy RF, Little M, Seymour J Pressure immobilisation
bandages in first-aid treatment of jellyfish envenomation: current recommendations reconsidered - Reply. MEDICAL Journal Of Australia 174 (12): 666-667 JUN 18 2001 45) Seymour J.E. and R.E. Jones. 2001 Geographic variation in host instar and species preference
of Microplitis demolitor towards two of its native hosts, Helicoverpa punctigera and Helicoverpa armigera. Australian Journal of Entomology. 40: 245-248 46) J.Seymour & P. Sutherland. 2001. Box jellyfish. Australian Natural History Autumn:32-41
47) Isbister GK, Little M, Seymour J , Jellyfish Stings. Veterinary And Human Toxicology 43 (6):
48) Isbister GK, Ramasamy S, Seymour JE, Hodgson WC. Verapamil treatment in severe
Chironex fleckeri stings. Toxicon. 2004 Dec 15;44(8):819-20. [Letter] 49) Pereira. P, T. Carrette, P. Cullen, R. Mulcahy, M. Little & J. Seymour 2001. Letter to editor:
Reply to Pressure immobilisation bandages in first aid treatment of jellyfish envenomation: current recommendations reconsidered. Medical Journal of Australia, Vol 174:12. 666-667 [Letter] Teresa Carrette
Refereed publications in the last 6 years
M. Little, P. Pereira, T. Carrette, J. Seymour. (2006) Jellyfish responsible for causing Irukandji
Syndrome Quarterly Medical Journal 99: 425-427

T. Carrette
J. Seymour. (2006) Cardiotoxic effects of venoms from Chironex fleckeri and
Chiropsalmus sp. on an invertebrate model. Journal of Venomous Animal Toxins including Tropical
Diseases
12: (2)245-254
T. Carrette
, J. Seymour. (2005) Vascular dopplers: a new way of recording cardiac parameters in
envenomed organisms. Toxicon 45:541-544
Marc Shorten, John Davenport, J. E. Seymour, Mary C. Cross, Teresa J. Carrette, Guy Woodward
and Thomas F. Cross. (2005) Kinematic analysis of swimming in Australian box jellyfish -
Chiropsalmus sp. and Chironex fleckeri (Cubozoa, Cnidaria, Chirodropidae). Journal of Zoology
267: 371-380.
T. Carrette, J. Seymour. (2005) Evidence for the occurrence of a lunar driven cyclic spawning in
offshore carybdeids BZoNQ Seminar series, James Cook University

T. Carrette
, J. Seymour. (2004) A Rapid and Repeatable Method for Venom Extraction From
Cubozoans. Toxicon 44: 135-139.
Little, M., P. Pereira, R. Mulcahy, T. Carrette & J. Seymour. (2004) Letter to the editor:
Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate as prehospital treatment for hypertension in Irukandji syndrome. 180:
482-483.
J. Seymour, T. Carrette, P. Sutherland. (2004) Do Box jellyfish sleep at Night? Medical Journal
of Australia,
181 :(11/12) 707
Huynh,T, J Seymour, P Pereira, R Mulcahy, P Cullen, T Carrette & M Little. (2003) Severity of
Irukandji Syndrome and Nematocyst Identification from Skin Scrapings. Medical Journal of
Australia
178:38-41
Little, M., P. Pereira, R. Mulcahy, P. Cullen, T. Carrette & J. Seymour. (2003). Severe Cardiac
Failure Associated With Presumed Jellyfish Sting; Can We Really Call It Severe Irukandji
Syndrome? Anesth & Emergency Medicine
Carrette, T., Cullen, P., Little, M., Pereira. P, and Seymour. J. (2002) Temperature Effects on Box
Jellyfish Venom: A Possible Treatment for Envenomed Patients? Medical Journal of Australia
177:654-655
Carrette, T., P. Alderlsade & J. Seymour. (2002) Nematocyst ratio and prey in two Australian
cubomedusans, Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp. Toxicon 40:1547-1551
Seymour, J., T. Carrette, P. Cullen, M. Little, R. Mulcahy & P. Pereira. (2002) The use of
pressure immobilization bandages in the first aid management of cubozoan envenomings. Toxicon
40:1503-1505


Pereira. P, T. Carrette, P. Cullen, R. Mulcahy, M. Little & J. Seymour (2001). Letter to
editor: Reply to Pressure immobilisation bandages in first aid treatment of jellyfish envenomation:
current recommendations reconsidered
. Medical Journal of Australia, Vol 174:12. 666-667
Pereira. P, T. Carrette, P. Cullen, R. Mulcahy, M. Little & J. Seymour. (2000) Pressure
immobilisation bandages in first aid treatment of jellyfish envenomation: current recommendations
reconsidered. Medical Journal of Australia, Vol 173:11/12 650-653
Matthew Gordon

BSc 1996, Hons 1997, JCU
Refereed publications:

Gordon, M., Hatcher, C & Seymour, J. (2004) Growth and age determination of the tropical
Australian cubozoans Chiropsalmus sp. Hydrobiologia: 530/531: 339-345.
Avril Underwood
Postgrad. Diploma in European Marketing & Languages, Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland
1995
Master of Arts, French and German Joint Major, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland, 1993
Refereed publications:
Underwood, A
., Jamie E Seymour. Venom ontogeny, diet and morphology in Carukia barnesi, a
species of Australian box jellyfish that causes Irukandji syndrome. Toxicon 2007 (In press)

Source: http://www.ellabay.com.au/pdfs_seis/G._Ella_Bay_SEIS_Appendices/A.3_Other_Supporting_Documents/A.3.9_James_Cook_&_University_Research_Proposals/JCU%20Submissions/Seymour_et_al.pdf

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INFORMAZIONI UTILI RELATIVE AL VIAGGIO CON IL TRENO Ciascun passeggero sarà dotato di una tessera che permetterà l’addebito dei servizi a pagamento (bar, bevande, lavanderia, telefono ecc.) in un unico conto. I passeggeri potranno saldare tali servizi di volta in volta o addebitarli su un conto da saldare alla fine del viaggio in contanti o con carta di credito. I conti di importo in

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