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Application

2010 Additional Year Application
Mesa County Cost-Share for Control of Noxious Weeds
Keep this sheet for further reference.
Please read thoroughly and fill out the Application carefully and completely. Incomplete applications will not be processed. Questions can be directed to Jude Sirota, Mesa County Pest Inspector, (970) 255-7120.
1. This application is for a cost-share for treatment of noxious weeds only (see attached list). Treatment of other weeds is not
covered. Weeds should be identified by the Mesa County Pest Inspector (970-255-7120), Colorado State University Cooperative
Extension agents (970-244-1834), Natural Resource Conservation Service (970-242-4511 ext. 3) or other qualified weed specialists.
2. Applications must be submitted by the deadlines of March 5, June 5 and September 5, 2010. Only one application per year is
necessary. There is NO deadline for List A species. Eligible weeds may be treated prior to approval of this Application as long as
effective herbicides, appropriate rates and timing of treatment have been followed and treatment has occurred within the current year.
Due to limited funding, no guarantee is made that the funding will be approved for treatments done prior to approval.
3. Eligible weeds may be treated by the landowner or their assignee, or by a licensed commercial pesticide applicator. Mesa County
will pay 75% of the cost for herbicide, adjuvants, and surfactants applied by the landowner OR 50% for treatment by a licensed
commercial pesticide applicator, AND/OR $8/hour for labor for mechanical control, if appropriate. A maximum of $500 will be paid
out by the County per landowner. Although landowners may personally apply herbicides to the noxious weeds, or utilize any agent
for application purposes, reimbursement for labor costs for herbicide application shall only apply to a licensed commercial pesticide
applicator. Any use of a landowner’s employee for herbicide application purposes shall not be reimbursable.
4. Limited tax dollars available for this Cost-Share Program will be used in the best manner possible. It is advisable to seek
appropriate weed control information from the Mesa County Pest Inspector, Colorado State University Extension Fact Sheets, the
Natural Resources Conservation Service, product labels, or qualified weed control specialists before completing your application.
Ineffective materials, incorrect rates, improper timing, and applications not consistent with the herbicide label will not be cost-shared.
5. Participants must treat eligible weeds on all areas of their property, including private roadsides, field accesses, fence lines, field
corners, ditches and waste areas as well as producing fields, unless prior arrangements are made with the Mesa County Pest Inspector.
Large infestations may need to be treated in phases, which should be indicated in the Noxious Weed Management Plan (page 5).
6. Only properties on the Mesa County property tax rolls are eligible for Cost-Share Funds.
A COMPLETE ADDITIONAL YEAR APPLICATION INCLUDES (please send ONLY these pages):
 1. A completed Application Form including all necessary information and signatures (page 4).
 2. A completed Noxious Weed Management Plan (page 5) – ONLY IF YOUR MANAGEMENT PLAN HAS CHANGED.
 3. A map of the property with location of infestations indicated – ONLY IF YOUR INFESTATION HAS CHANGED.
 4. A completed, signed and witnessed “Mesa County Noxious Weed Control Cost Share Agreement” (pages 6-7).
DEADLINES: The deadlines for submitting an Application for cost-share funds are March 5, June 5 and September 5, 2010.
Applications will be accepted at any time before the deadlines. Applications to control weeds on “List A” of the Prioritized Noxious
Weed List will be accepted and evaluated any time during the year. Once you receive notice of approval of your application, you
have until November 15, 2010, to turn in your original receipts. Please copy the receipts for your records
NOTIFICATION OF APPROVAL
1. Applications will be evaluated by the Mesa County Weed Advisory Board and the Mesa County Pest Inspector based on
completeness of the Application, adequacy of the Noxious Weed Plan, and target weeds.
2. A photocopy of the signed and dated Application and Agreement will be mailed to you indicating approval and any conditions or
changes to be made to the Noxious Weed Plan. Originals will be kept at the Pest Inspector’s office. Applications not approved for
cost-share will be so marked and returned.
3. After your original receipts are turned in, your reimbursement check will be processed by the Mesa County Finance Department.
REASONS FOR DISQUALIFICATION
1. Attempting to defraud the program in any manner.
2. Applying herbicides inconsistent with the product label (over or under labeled rates or on unapproved sites).
3. Using program materials on lands outside of the program guidelines.
4. Failure to follow the Noxious Weed Management Plan.
5. Using cost-share funds to control weeds other than those that are eligible, except where they co-exist with eligible weeds.
Make copies of the Application and keep a copy of your receipts for your records. Late applications or receipts will not be
accepted or processed without prior approval of the Mesa County Weed Advisory Board.

Send application and original receipts to:
Mesa County Division of Pest Management, P.O. Box 20,000-5025, Grand Junction, CO 81502-5025. Instructions
for Completing the Additional Year Noxious Weed Cost Share Application Plan

A NEW Weed Plan (page 5) is only necessary if there are changes to your previous years’ Weed Plan.
Check the Prioritized Noxious Weed List for Management on Private Property (pages 8-10) included in
this application to make sure the weeds you have are eligible for this program. You must have at least one of
the listed weeds to be eligible.
Additional Year Noxious Weed Management Plan (Page 4)

1) Check the box at top of page and fill in year. Fill in landowner information, including name, address, 2) List target weeds: use accepted common names or scientific names and indicate who identified the 3) Check whether there are changes to your Weed Plan (fill out new Weed Plan) or Weed Map (send new map); indicate if you will use a professional applicator. 4) List any weed related workshops you have attended. Several workshops are offered locally each year by the Division of Pest Management, CSU Extension, Natural Resource Conservation Service and others. Training in weed management increases the chances of successful weed control. 5) Read the agreement paragraph and sign and date at the bottom. The Inspector will sign the form when
Additional Year Noxious Weed Management Plan – Table (Page 5)
Complete the Weed Management Plan ONLY if there are changes in weed species, herbicide to be used,
rates or timing. If there are no changes, we will use the previous year’s Plan.

1) Weed Treatment Plan
a. Target Weed: List the common name and/or scientific name of the target weed or weeds.
b. Management Method: The management method MUST be an accepted, effective measure for
the weed you are trying to control. List all methods intended to be used. Chemical control is the use of herbicides, whether they are traditional herbicides (e.g.
Roundup) or alternatives such as vinegar or corn gluten. The herbicide you use must be
effective for control of the weeds you have listed.
Mechanical control is generally effective only for annual and biennial weeds. Controls
include tillage, hoeing, hand grubbing, chopping, etc.
Biological control is the use of grazing animals (sheep, goats, cattle), diseases, or insects
whose feeding on the weeds decreases its productivity. Biological control usually will not
eradicate a weed, it will only reduce the population and/or stop it from reproducing.
Biological control is not reimbursable under this Application.
Cultural Controls include planting competitive plants, proper irrigation, fertilization and
general good land stewardship practices.
c. Herbicide Recommendation:
i. Product: Select an herbicide that effectively controls the weed species you are targeting.
Herbicide recommendations should be confirmed by a professional. ii. Rate: List the rate as recommended or as listed on the label.
iii. Rates are given either as an amount per acre (for broadcast spraying) or an amount per iv. DO NOT USE MORE OR LESS THAN THE LABELED RATE! The label is the
LAW. Effective weed management is based on using the RIGHT herbicide at the
RIGHT time at the RIGHT rate.

d. Timing/Growth Stage: List the approximate time (month) or specific growth stage (bud/bloom,
seedling, etc.) the weed will be treated. It is critical that each weed species be treated at a specific time of the year or at a specific growth stage for effective control. 2) Surfactants and adjuvants: These are additives to the spray tank that help the herbicide penetrate,
spread on or stick to the leaf surface, making the herbicide more effective. Many herbicides require
an additive
. Check the label for the type of additive or ask your herbicide dealer. The program covers
costs for these products.

3) Phased Management Plan: If the infestations on your property are too large, treatment may need to be
done over a long period of time, perhaps several years. Prioritize the areas to be treated. Small infestations and those on ditches, ponds, and other water sources should be a high priority for treatment. Treating the outer perimeter of large infestations rather than the entire infestation should keep the infestation from getting larger; continue to treat the weeds from the edges to the center. See above information on management methods and treatment timing.
4) Revegetation/Seeding: A weed management plan will not be successful unless some type of
competitive vegetation can be established. This may not be feasible in all areas of your property. Where it is appropriate (for example, producing fields), describe the area to be seeded, the plant species you will use, time (month) and method of planting (direct drilling, interseeding, broadcast), and other land management processes you will use (such as irrigation, fertilization, soil amendments). 5) MAP: We have your map on file. You do not have to submit another map unless the weed infestations
have changed in size or location or new weeds have been found. If you have been a cost-share client
for several years, the size of infestations should be changing and a new map may be requested.


Mesa County Noxious Weed Control Cost Share Agreement (Pages 6-7)

1) READ THIS DOCUMENT THOROUGHLY.
2) Fill in your name and address in the blanks at the top of the form.
3) Under the second “WHEREAS” fill in the location of the property on the line provided.
4) On the second page, fill in the date, month and year you signed the agreement.
5) Both the landowner and a witness must sign the agreement and print their name underneath. The
Inspector will sign the agreement after approval of the Application. Please do not hesitate to call the Mesa County Division of Pest Management
at 255-7120 for assistance with your application.
2010 Noxious Weed Management Plan
 I have participated in this program since _______ Mailing Address of Property Owner: ____________________________________________ 2) Target Weed(s):
3) My noxious weed plan has changed (make changes on next page)

My noxious weed plan is the same as last year
My weed map has changed (attach new map)
 I plan to use the services of a professional weed control company. 4) What weed related workshop(s) have you attended?
This Noxious Weed Management Plan was developed between the Landowner(s) and the Mesa County Noxious Weed Cost-Share Program. The Plan fulfills the requirements of the Mesa County Policy for Noxious Weed Management on Private Property and the Noxious Weed Cost-Share Program. The Landowner(s) acknowledges the presence of noxious weeds and the importance of taking action to manage them on her/his property. The management decisions outlined herein are agreeable to both parties and, if performed properly and on time, will meet the management objectives listed for each weed and for the land use objectives stated by the landowner. _______________________________ (CONTINUED)
2010 Noxious Weed Management Plan
Indicate changes to previous Weed Plan below:
Weed Treatment Plan:
Target Weed(s)
Surfactants and adjuvants to be added to herbicide:
Name

Phased Management Plan (where all areas cannot be managed simultaneously or areas will be treated differently):
Description of Target Area
(include product and rate for herbicides) (approx. date)
Revegetation/Seeding (if needed):
Area to be seeded
Other Pertinent Land Management Processes
A map of the property is on file.
MESA COUNTY NOXIOUS WEED CONTROL
COST SHARE AGREEMENT
THIS AGREEMENT is by and between ____________________________________________________ (“Landholder”), whose address is ___________________________________________________, and Mesa County, Colorado, by and through the Mesa County Pest Inspector, whose address is Box 20,000-5025, Grand Junction, CO 81502-5025 (“County”). WHEREAS, County is offering to certain landowners who qualify for the Mesa County Cost Share for Control of Noxious WHEREAS, Landholder owns or leases property in Mesa County DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS (enter physical address
or brief description of location):
_____________________________________________________________________ This property is located within the borders of Mesa County, and WHEREAS, Landholder desires to participate in the Cost Share Program, and agrees to pay all necessary costs and fees and abide by all of the conditions stated in this Agreement. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual promises and covenants stated herein, the parties agree as follows: NOXIOUS WEED SPECIES IDENTIFIED: The weed species identified in the Prioritized Noxious Weed List for Management on Private Property. County agrees: to cost share with the Landholder, herbicide and surfactant or adjuvant costs incurred by the Landholder in controlling the weed species described above and the professional application of the herbicide on the property described above, on a 75% basis for landowner applied herbicides or 50% basis for professional application, up to a maximum total cost to the County of $500.00. County shall pay its share to Landholder within 30 days after Landholder submits to County a receipt for full payment of the costs of herbicide. “Professional Application” as used in this paragraph means a commercial licensed pesticide applicator. Landholder agrees: to cost share with the County, herbicide and surfactant or adjuvant costs incurred by the
Landholder in controlling the weed species checked above and the professional application of the herbicide
on the property described above, on a 25% basis for landowner applied herbicides, or 50% basis for
professional application, up to a maximum total cost to the County of $500.00. Landholder shall submit to
County, no later than November 15 of the year purchased, a receipt for full payment of the costs of
herbicide and surfactant or adjuvant in order to receive payment from County. Landholder agrees to be
solely responsible for applying the herbicide or arranging for its application on the property, subject to the
cost share arrangement set out above.
Landholder further agrees: to follow the requirements contained in the Cost-Share Application, including the control procedures and the recommended type of herbicide. TERM: This Agreement shall be in effect for the term beginning upon Pest Inspector signature and ending upon
completion of the cost share program described above or, at the latest, by November 15 of the current year.
INDEMNIFICATION AND HOLD HARMLESS: Landholder agrees to indemnify against liability and to save harmless County from any liability or damages County may suffer as a result of claims, demands, costs, or judgments instituted against County, its agents, employees, invitees, or any person claiming through them, arising (CONTINUED)
out of Landholder’s, his agents’ or employees’ negligence or intentional acts in the course of applying the herbicide contemplated herein, or arising from any accident, injury or damages, however caused, including the acts and omissions of third parties, to any person or persons, or to the property of any persons, or corporations occurring during or arising out of applying the herbicide contemplated herein. Landholder further agrees to hold harmless and defend County, by counsel reasonably satisfactory to the County, against all claims and demands arising out of Landholder, his agency or employees, applying the herbicide contemplated herein, no matter whether such claims are made informally, in arbitration or mediation proceedings, or in court proceedings. NO WAIVER OF IMMUNITY: No portion of this Agreement shall be deemed to constitute a waiver of any immunities the parties or their officers or employees may possess, nor shall any portion of this Agreement be deemed to have created a duty of care which did not previously exist with respect to any person not a party to this Agreement. NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARY ENFORCEMENT: It is expressly understood and agreed that the enforcement of the terms and conditions of this Agreement, and all rights of action relating to such enforcement, shall be strictly reserved to the undersigned parties and nothing in this Agreement shall give or allow any claim or right of action whatsoever by any other person not included in this Agreement. It is the express intention of the undersigned parties that any entity other than the undersigned parties receiving services or benefits under this Agreement shall be an incidental beneficiary only. CANCELLATION: This Agreement may be cancelled by either party upon thirty days written notice.
SIGNED this ______________ day of ________________________, 20__.
LANDHOLDER:
WITNESS*:
MESA COUNTY, COLORADO, by and through the MESA COUNTY PEST INSPECTOR Prioritized Noxious Weed List for Management on Private Property
1/1/2010
The following list of weeds is intended to be used in making decisions about the weeds that will be eligible for the Mesa County Noxious Weed Cost Share Program. You must have at least one of these weeds on your property to qualify for the Program. Information on the State Noxious Weed Act and State Weed Lists can be found at http://www.colorado.gov/ag/weeds Images of the County Listed Noxious Weeds can be found on the Mesa County Pest Management Web Site: http://www.mesacounty.us/ (go to Departments > Pest Management). Images of
other weeds listed here can be found on various web sites or in the book “Weeds of the West”.
Professional assistance should be obtained to positively identify your weeds.

LIST A - SPECIES TO BE ERADICATED WHEREVER FOUND: List A weeds pose a significant
threat to the State and must be eradicated statewide. List A weeds occur in low numbers or are not
known to be present in Mesa County.
MANAGEMENT GOAL: The County will assist the landowner in all aspects of eradication
including designing management plans, technical information, scouting, herbicide, equipment,
personnel, and Cost-Share funding as available. It is expected that infestations of these weeds will be
small and inexpensive to eradicate if detected early. Repeated treatment and monitoring over a number
of years will be necessary for List A weeds.
LIST B – SPECIES TO BE ERADICATED, SUPRESSED OR CONTAINED: List B weeds to be
eradicated are either low in numbers or not yet present in Mesa County. List B species to be contained or
suppressed are locally abundant in the areas listed in the Table 1. They should be controlled so as to
prevent their spread.
MANAGEMENT GOAL: The County will assist the landowner in all aspects of eradication of
List B weeds (if deemed necessary as mentioned above) including designing management plans, technical information, scouting, herbicide, equipment, personnel, and Cost-Share funding as available. It is expected that infestations of these weeds will be less than one acre in size and relatively inexpensive to treat. For List B weeds to be contained or suppressed (as determined above), the County will provide technical information, assistance with management plans, and Cost-Share funds as available. Repeated treatment and monitoring over a number of years may be necessary for some List B weeds. LIST C – SPECIES TO BE CONTAINED, SUPPRESSED, OR OTHERWISE MANAGED: These
weeds are abundant throughout Mesa County.
MANAGEMENT GOAL: All effort should be made to prevent the spread of these weeds
wherever they occur in Mesa County. These species should be managed to achieve containment, suppression, and reduction of patch size where they are locally abundant and where infestations cross property lines. Eradication is not necessarily a goal for species on this list but should be considered where the infestations are small. The County will provide technical information, assistance with management plans, and Cost-Share funds as available. It is expected that infestations of these weeds will be large (greater than 1 acre) and will be more expensive to treat. Repeated treatment and monitoring over a number of years may be necessary. Prioritized Noxious Weed List for Management on Private Property
1/1/2010
TABLE 1A: COUNTY LISTED NOXIOUS WEEDS
Management Goal
Geographical Areas
1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
arvense) Dalmatian toadflax – broad leaf 1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
ERADICATION
ERADICATION
1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
(Cardaria draba)
Houndstongue (Cynoglossum
1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
ERADICATION
1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
ERADICATION
acanthoides)
Purple loosestrife (Lythrum
ERADICATION
salicaria)
Russian knapweed (Acroptilon
CONTAINMENT/SUPRESSION
repens) (L)
Scotch thistle (Onopordum
1) CONTAINMENT/SUPPRESSION
2) ERADICATION
ERADICATION
maculosa)
Yellow starthistle (Centaurea
ERADICATION
solstitialis)
Yellow toadflax (Linaria
ERADICATION
vulgaris)

TABLE 1B: OTHER ELIGIBLE WEEDS
State List
Prioritized Noxious Weed List for Management on Private Property
1/1/2010
TABLE 2: STATE LISTED NOXIOUS WEEDS TO BE ERADICATED IN MESA COUNTY

State List
Absinth wormwood (Artemesia absinthium) Chinese clematis (Clematis orientalis) Common crupina (Crupina vulgaris) Cypress spurge (Euphorbia cyparissias) Dalmatian toadflax – narrow leaf (Linaria genistifolia) Eurasian water milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) AQUATIC Giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta) AQUATIC Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) AQUATIC Meadow knapweed (Centaurea pratensis) Mediterranean sage (Salvia aethiopis) Medusahead rye (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) Myrtle spurge (Euphorbia myrsinites) Orange hawkweed (Hieracium aurantiacum) Perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) Rush skeletonweed (Chondrilla juncea) Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) Squarrose knapweed (Centaurea virgata) St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum)
TIMING OF CONTROL (to be used in the Weed Treatment Plan)

The proper timing of control measures is extremely important for effective control of weeds. However, timing may change
due to plant growth patterns, weather conditions, land use practices, and other obstacles. The following schedule for
implementing control measures should be used as a guideline by participants in the Cost-Share Program. Control timing
other than that listed or for weeds not listed here must be approved by the Mesa County Pest Inspector.
Dalmation toadflax (Linaria dalmatica) Diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) Goatshead/Puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris) Hoary cress or white top (Cardaria draba) Houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale) Oxeye daisy (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum) Plumeless thistle (Carduus acanthoides) Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) Scotch thistle (Onopordum acanthium) Spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) Yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) Yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris) RESOURCES FOR WEED AND LAND MANAGEMENT

Technical Information
Professional Applicators
Mesa County Division of Pest Management
See “Weed Control” in the Yellow Pages or call CSU Cooperative Extension, 244.1834, for a list Jude Sirota, Weed & Pest Inspector 255.7120 Karen Eslinger, Pest Management Specialist Local Herbicide Sources
CSU Tri River Area Cooperative Extension
Information on all aspects of land management. Field visits available for a small charge. Natural Resource Conservation Service
Land improvement programs (WHIP, EQUIP), 3217 I-70 Business Loop (Peach Tree Shopping field visits, and technical information on land Palisade Insectary
gardening stores carry some herbicides but may not carry specialty herbicides used to control Source for biological control agents for weed control. Biocontrol is recommended ONLY for very large infestations of certain weeds. Agents

Source: http://www.mesacounty.us/mcweb/PestManagement/2010%20Cost-Share%20Application%20Additional%20Year.pdf

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